Hike To Laurel Snow Waterfall

April 1, 2017

The morning drive to Laurel Snow Pocket Wilderness started out with drizzling rain and very cool temperatures.  There were four of us on this trip. My nephew and his girlfriend and a good friend of mine from work. None of them had been there before and I was excited to show them the area.

When we arrived the parking lot already had several cars and, because the day was to clear up and be nice, I knew there would be a lot more people showing up.

We started out for the stroll on the Richland Creek Part of the trail. This section is easy. Anyone who is a budding photographer or limited in their ability to hike long distances will love this section. You could just stay on this part all day and not run out of photo ops. It’s absolutely gorgeous.

There is an entrance to the old mine that websites say you are not to go in. Well, I don’t know how serious they are about that since it’s wide open and clearly, everyone who does this hike goes into the mine.  If they are serious about that then it needs a gate.  It’s very dark so if you really want to see anything be sure to have a flashlight handy.

Once you are past that, the trail will turn sharply to the right. I actually missed the turn and kept going straight until I realized something was wrong. I saw the ‘main trail’ sign when I turned around.

So now, the ascent begins. It is steady going up and loaded with switchbacks and ‘short cuts’ leading straight up. I may do a couple of short cuts here and there, but for the most part, I stay on the regular trail.

There was a long 150′ foot bridge that had been there since 1976. However, several years ago it was damaged during a storm.  Up until sometime recently it was still there and was a mangled mess. It was there the first time I went but has since been removed. Now there is no man-made crossing. You have to use fallen trees.  We watched some other hikers and decided what they were doing was the easiest and it was. We got over the creek with no problem at all.

The difficulty in the trail picks up a bit once you cross the creek. There are several rock fields you have to go through and it’s very easy to slip and roll and ankle. It’s a steady climb up the trail. At one point, where the tiny falls where the crosses are painted on the rock, you will have to climb through a small tunnel to get to the other side of the trail. This area is very pretty and there are several smaller falls making for some great photo ops.

After stopping for a few minutes for lunch on the trail we were back at it and got to the falls within just a few minutes. The falls are very impressive. It’s 80 feet tall and, if the rains have been good, will be flowing well enough to get some good long exposure pictures. I don’t know how well it would be flowing in the dryer summer months. So, if you go in the summer just make sure it’s after a rain. It would be a huge disappointment to go all that way for it to be a trickle.

You can climb up on the rocks to get a closer view of the falls. I did not do that on this trip. To be honest, I was tired and just wanted to sit and look up at them for awhile before heading back down.

When we got back down to the Richland Creek trail we saw some people practicing rock climbing. We met a girl carrying a mattress type thing on her back. It was really funny. She had a very determined look on her face. I turned around once she passed and snapped a picture. When we got back to the trailhead I was shocked at how many cars there were. I had never seen it that crowded before. So, just be sure if you go on the weekend to get there early to beat the crowds.

Need to know:

  • Hard Hike
  • Depending on what website you look at you will see various mileage reports. The Fitbit said it was just under 7 miles (round trip)Some sites say 4. Who knows? Just plan on about 4-5 hours (breaks and picture time added in)
  • Good shoes!!
  • Trekking poles ( I NEVER hike without them)
  • Snacks/Water
  • Camera/tripod/neutral density filters for long exposture water flowing pictures