My Favorite Backpacking YouTube Channels Part 1.

I love YouTube. I mean, I REALLY love YouTube. As a matter of fact, I watch more YouTube videos than I do regular TV.  This hiking obsession of mine took root in several channels. So, I thought I would post them here in case someone else has caught the hiking bug and is looking for everything from DIY hammock gear, to amazing photography and cinematography, to just good old fashioned trip reports.

I will start with my number one channel.

  • It’s the man, the myth, the legend…WHOOOOOO BUDDY! It’s Shug!

Yep, you read that right, Shug. Shug’s real name is Sean Emery and he is a professional clown. Can you see where this is going?  A clown that hikes…hmmm…has it peeked your interest? Shug was one of those guys I kept hearing mentioned on other channels. Finally one day I just typed his name in to see who this person was that seemed to be some sort of hiking god. Well, after watching one video I was hooked. In fact, I started watching his videos in bed at night while going to sleep. My husband was concerned at the fact that I was watching some guy and laughing so hard it would keep him awake. He is seriously funny. He is also a hammock guru. The man knows just about everything about hammock camping. He has several videos on how to get the perfect ‘hang’. He is also a very accomplished backpacker having backpacked and camped most of his life in North Carolina and Minnesota.

  • Sintax77–Also a Shawn. What are the odds?

Admittedly when his videos first popped up as a suggestion on YouTube I had a hard time getting into them. However, I hung in there and really started enjoying his style of editing and now I can’t wait for his videos to come out.  His filming and editing have come a long way from just a few years ago. He does awesome trip reports and his gear reviews are really helpful (especially to newbies).  His wife, Sara, is also in a lot of the videos and it’s good to get a woman’s perspective on the gear as well.

One of the most extreme hiking videos I have ever watched was his High Winds Hiking and Winter Camping in the White Mountain video. You have GOT to check it out. Intense, to say the least.

Also, check out his website for detailed trip reports.

  • Adventure Archives comes in at Number 3.

Andrew, Bryan, Robby and Thomas are four incredibly talented cinematographers. A lot of the music in their videos is written by them and almost all of the music has an Asian feel to it.  I suppose that’s one of the reasons I am drawn to their videos. The editing is so well done and the music takes you right along into each scene that makes the wilderness seem like a completely safe place.

  • Joe Robinet is at Number 4.

Joe is one I have been watching for a long time. If you want to learn the art of bush crafting then this is one of the best channels, in my opinion, on YouTube. I have learned so much about shelter building and fire making and just overall how to have a good time in the woods, without being stressed, from this channel. He and his trusty dog, Scout, head out the woods alone, most of the time, and take us all along for the journey. He’s one whose video production style has changed and gotten better over the years. Joe was also a contestant on the second season of the TV show ‘Alone’. You can check out his website here.

  • John Amorosano rounds out the top 5.

Now, don’t think because he’s number five in my list that his channel isn’t worth checking out. All of these channels have different things to offer. John’s videos are hands down, some of the most beautifully filmed that I have seen on all of YouTube. I found his channel while researching the John Muir Trail. I have watched his videos over and over.

That’s it for part 1. Part 2 will be up shortly so keep checking back.

Happy Hiking!

Hike to Busby Falls

Short Springs Natural Area in Tullahoma, Tn is, most notably, home to Machine Falls. It is the main destination for most people. However, the area has so much more to offer than just Machine Falls.

I have been to the area on numerous occasions and have photographed Machine Falls every time I have gone.  However, today I had another destination in mind. I wanted to hike back to Busby Falls. There is an overlook trail that takes you to a neat little area that overlooks (hence the name) upper Busby Falls. I have been to this overlook several times and have always wanted to see the falls from below.

The trail is quite tricky to navigate and there are no signs even indicating that you can get there the way I went. So, listen closely, and you can also trek to this little, hidden gem that I assure you few people would try to get to. Keep in mind I did this solo. So, you can do it too.

The day started out with rain. It was expected so I wasn’t too concerned and I made sure I brought along a big umbrella. I know most hikers use ponchos. I would if I did not have glasses.  Poncho’s don’t keep the rain off your face and that drives me nuts. The umbrella works fine for me.

In your GPS just put in Short Springs Natural Area in Tullahoma, Tn. You will park at a large water tower. They have recently actually made an officially paved parking area.  It had been just a gravel pull off.  You will park, and then cross the street to start the trail.

I would encourage you to go to the Busby Falls overlook trail first. It’s a nice little hike and will give you an idea of where you will be hiking up to.  The trail goes on over a bridge but, the last time I was there it just went onto a small loop trail that brought you right back to the bridge and there really wasn’t much to see on the loop.  But, by all means, check it out if you want.

Since I did not go to the overlook on this trip I cannot remember if the trail takes you back to the Machine Falls loop or not. So, if there are no signs pointing you to Machine Falls come back to the trail head and take the Machine Falls Trail. Stay on the main trail. You will eventually come to the part of the trail that you can tell is getting a little more rugged.  You will descend down a very steep area with some wooden steps. Go all the way to the bottom. You will see a sign pointing you to Machine Falls (don’t go over the bridge)  to the right and the Wildflower Trail to the left.  Even though this post is about Busby Falls PLEASE DO GO check out Machine Falls. It’s RIGHT THERE and it’s stunning.

To get to Busby Falls take the Wildflower Loop trail and go counter clockwise (mainly because the clockwise way was very overgrown).  You will follow the loop right to the point where it would be looping to come back to the beginning. You will see a small trail that goes straight to the right (it’s right at the center of the loop).

This is where it gets fun. In a sort of weird, hiker fun kinda way. Normal people will not think this is fun.

Now, when I say ‘trail to Busby Falls’ I use this term ‘trail’ lightly. What little actual trail there is comes and goes and has been closed off by various blow downs. Basically, you will be in a very rocky creek bed that you will follow all the way to the falls. The good thing is you can’t really get lost since it just takes you one place…the falls.  You will, however, get wet. Your feet will, more than likely, be completely submerged in water or muck at some point on this little jaunt. So, take either water shoes or a change of socks and shoes with you.  As always I do not recommend flip flops or sandals.

This is what you will be walking through. I am not sure about the mileage. I don’t think it is all that far. Maybe, at most a half mile, but I doubt it’s even that far. It was just so slow going that it seemed that far.

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Along the way, there were several smaller falls coming off the sides of the hills on either side as you walk down the creek bed.  I only stopped and took pictures of one.  Can you tell why? (cough, cough) No, I did not make this Cairn, but I love it!!

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Tons of photo ops on this trail from water features to cairns, to mountain laurel that was falling from the trees above the falls.

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bf9The pollen was really bad. I didn’t realize that my lens was covered when I took this picture. I still like it though. I was constantly wiping my lens off.

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Pretty much the whole way you can hear the falls. Just keep following the creek bed and the sound and you will eventually get there.

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This area was so beautiful that three hours passed before I knew it. I had literally stayed three hours here taking pictures.  I climbed over more stuff and walked through more stinky mud than I have in a long time to get some of these pictures. And I absolutely loved every minute of it. Well, except for the mosquitos. They were BAD.

So, there you have it. A beautiful, hard hike that I would do again in a second.  Take your time. Oh, and watch out for snakes. Surprisingly I did not see a single one, but I know they had to be there.

Here are some need to knows before you go:

  • Bug Spray.  A LOT of bug spray. In fact, don’t just spray it on. Soak in a vat of Deet from head to toe.  I used skin so soft which usually does the trick. Well, not with these mosquitos. They must be terminator mosquitos. I have over 50 bites to prove it.  As a matter of fact, they are why I left and didn’t go back to the overlook.
  • Good Shoes/water shoes that you don’t mind getting wet and muddy
  • Extra shoes to change back into and socks as well
  • Water. It was 89% humidity yesterday and I felt every bit of it.  Take more than you think you will drink.
  • Snacks
  • Camera
  • Neutral Density Filter if a sunny day. You could get by without one if it’s very overcast.
  • Tripod

 

Winding Stairs

A quick text from my nephew came in the other day to tell me about a park in Lafayette, Tn in Macon county. He asked if I had ever been to this park. Nope. It was a new one to me, but I could not wait to check it out. There was very little online about it, but I did manage to find a few YouTube videos and a couple of news articles talking about the city acquiring the land.

I typed in Winding Stairs Park into google and off I went. As usually happens with new areas google took me past the clearly marked park entrance down a road that dead ended at a family cemetery.  I decided to just see where google would take me. I thought maybe it knows better. Obviously, not. So, I backtracked and went back to the sign. If you put in Hearthstone Inn in Lafayette it will take you right to the entrance. It’s next door to the little motel. There is a long gravel road you will go down passing a small fishing pond. Parking for the pond is across from it on the driveway. Keep going and you will see a pavilion with parking.

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The park is so new, in fact,  that there are no printed maps. I took a picture of the hand drawn map that was stuck at the pavilion.

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The area is quite pretty but the falls are a little difficult to see in the summer months. I expect it to be much better viewing in the fall and winter. There are several trails that lead all around this large basin where you can hear water and you know there is a waterfall, but it’s just difficult to see and almost impossible to get a good picture. Some of the trails lead you to the bottom but then are roped off indicating, I guess, that they don’t want you going beyond that point.

There is a short paved trail that is wheelchair accessible that leads to a nice overlook area. But again, because it’s summer, there just isn’t anything to see once you get there.

The easiest trail to the cascades is the Red Oak Trail. Both Jacob’s Ladder and the Cascades Trail are very steep and, if it has rained, very muddy.  A lady I ran into showed me how to get down to smaller falls via the Red Oak Trail and said that it was the easiest one. Now, easiest is relative to your own hiking experiences. I would call this trail moderate. Jacobs Ladder is strenuous. I actually came back up from the cascades via JL. I did not do the whole cascades trail. I only went by what the lady told me as to the difficulty of it.

These are some of the trails down towards the falls in the basin. As you can see very steep.

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When you are in the parking lot standing at the kiosk. Do not take the trail straight ahead. Instead, take the trail that is to the left of the kiosk. It will take you down to the Red Oak Trail.  The sign is across the creek and you have to look for it. Sort of like if it were a snake it would have bit you.

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Before heading up the Red Oak Trail stop at the creek and walk down a bit and you can climb down to these. It is VERY SLICK. I had to scoot on my butt to get down there to these. The map is very accurate. If you look at it this spot is right after the blue line crosses over the creek.

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There were several little moles running around down there. So, if you have a backpack make sure to keep it on. I had dropped my pack but decided to put it back on. I didn’t want one of the little critters getting in and scaring me later in the car.  Here is a little video I took of a suicidal mole.

After that, I went on up the Red Oak Trail and followed the little map to the cascade waterfalls. The trail was very dense and so green. I mean REALLY green. I am certain that in the fall this will be a gorgeous little hike. So, follow the map and go past Jacobs Ladder and follow on up to the cascades. There are two sets. The one on the left looks like it will be really pretty once all the brush is cleared away from it. Right now you can barely see the water peeking through all the blow down that is across it. The one that you can see though is very nice.

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On the way back up I took Jacobs Ladder. I wanted to see if it was as hard as the woman made it sound. Well, yes it was. If I had not had my trekking poles there would have been and ‘incident’ no doubt.

(This was at the top of the hill)

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This is on the way up and this wasn’t even the steepest part.

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Once at the top, you are standing in front of the 100-year-old oak tree and there is the most beautiful bench you will ever see. I was so happy to see it.

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After making sure I wasn’t having a stroke I took the trail that is back to the left of the bench. It’s a short walk back to the car from that point. Technically you could more quickly get down to the cascades by going down Jacobs Ladder. Just know that it is incredibly steep and you really do need trekking poles or, at the very least, sturdy sticks.

Now for my soap box.

This was an enjoyable hike. It was very crowded. What I saw were a lot of folks that had absolutely no clue what they were in for on these trails. I saw lots of cute sandals and flip flops, lots of kids being carried by their parents and lots of hands carrying no water. I have hiked a lot. All of these could be issues in the right conditions. Granted, it’s not a long hike as far as hiking goes. It is, however, strenuous and in hot months you can become dehydrated very quickly. Carrying small children up something like Jacobs Ladder is an accident waiting to happen. If I were with the city I would be sure to post something about carrying water and wearing proper footwear. There was a sign giving the usual warnings about not playing on the rocks etc, but nothing about water or footwear.

What to know:

  • Good Shoes (no flip flops)
  • Water
  • Trekking Poles or sturdy sticks
  • Don’t carry your kids
  • Camera
  • Tripod
  • Neutral Density Filter for waterfall photography
  • Take a photo of the map