Hike on The Honey Creek Loop

woods2

This poem, by Robert Frost, is what comes to mind when I think of the Honey Creek Loop. It’s a dark, other worldly trail nestled in Big South Fork. It is impossible to find the words to adequately describe its beauty.

It is my all-time favorite hiking trail. It is a strenuous hike that is worth every ounce of pain you may have the following day. I put it on a difficulty level of Virgin Falls (maybe even a little more difficult due to a couple of boulder climbs with a rope you have to do.) There are a couple of large rock houses and one with  a cool ladder you can climb up into.  There is also a waterfall that, when flowing, is absolutely stunning.

The hike is around six miles and the trail is not well marked. This is a tricky one. If you go make sure you give yourself plenty of time and have some sort of map with you. It is very easy to lose your bearings once you really get into the thick of it. Make sure someone knows which trail you are on.

A camera is a must. I took a gazillion pictures. Your feet will likely get a little wet, maybe even soaked in certain areas.

The hike we did was right around 6 miles and we went about a mile an hour. This is not a trail you want to zip through as fast as you can. I have never understood why people do that anyway. You will have to take it slow just because of the terrain and the photo ops that are everywhere.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Happy Hiking!

HCL050HCLHCL

Hike to Buzzard Point

Date of Hike: November 11, 2017
Length: Total 10 miles (out and back–not a loop)
Difficulty: Moderate to strenuous (in certain areas but mostly due to length)

The intention was to hike to Snow Falls. It changed midway when another hiker told us to skip the falls and head to Buzzard Point.

Laurel-Snow is absolutely gorgeous. I have hiked to Laurel Falls on two other occasions so I was a little familiar with the area. The hike starts out on the Richland Creek trail and you follow it just like you would if you were going to Laurel Falls.

bb33cc

bb19cc

Just follow the trail and look for the marker that leads you up the hill on the right. Continue on that trail until you come to the washed out bridge. Yep, you read it right. The bridge that was placed there in 1976 is long gone. They completely removed it a couple of years ago. Now, there is only a log and it’s a little sketchy getting across. I think it’s about a mile and a half in that you will come to this. (UPDATE: The bridge has been restored!! No more climbing over a log!)

bb21cc

I am sure these scoutmasters would be thrilled to know I captured this lovely picture. There are a couple of ways you can do this (oh, and no need to look upstream or downstream for an easier way…there isn’t one). The log is it. You can walk on across it if you are stable enough. I was not. I actually sat side saddle on it and just scooted myself over it. It was very easy to do it that way. Much easier than any other way I could see. It was a little difficult on the way back since the tree was slanted on the way back. Always be sure to unsnap your backpack when doing any type of fording. Your backpack can pull you right under the water. If it’s loosened you can get out of it if needed.

bb20ccbb21ccbb23cc

As you can tell this is a rugged trail. There are a lot of rocks and roots. It beautiful but it will be slow going.

You will come to this cute little water feature where someone has painted crosses on the rock.

bb24cc

And you will see this sign:

bb25cc

To get to Buzzard Point just follow the Snow Falls sign. If I’m not mistaken this is the last sign you will see indicating you are going towards snow falls and you will see none that say anything about Buzzard Point (at least none that I saw). I had no idea we were going anywhere near Buzzard (it has been on my list for a few years). We had walked for a good while when a couple told us to skip the falls and head to BP. So, that’s what we did.

After walking for a while we finally came to the metal bridges. I knew there were suppose to be some I just wasn’t sure where they were. Once you head down the hill towards a HUGE rock you might get confused on how to get to the bridge.

bb26cc

You will need to walk up on the side of the rock. Look closely and you can see the rusted, metal posts sticking up from the rock.

bb27cc

Just keep following around and then hold your breath when you see it.

bb28cc

bb29ccbb7ccbb5ccbb8ccbb9ccbb10ccbbcc4

See what I mean? I could have stayed here all day taking pictures. The view from it was amazing.

bb6cc

The rest of the hike was full of awe at how spectacular the area was.

BP1ccbbcc2bb18cc

Finally, we got to the trail leading between the two rocks (again no sign saying anything about where we were). The only sign was one that pointed us back to the parking area. Say wha? Yeah, made zero sense.

bb40cc

bb17cc

Once you get to the top of the rocks there will be what looks to be an old logging road. To get to Buzzard Point take a left and walk until you can’t. There were several groups up there when were there. Lots of scouts and hiking groups were checking it out.

bb16ccbb30ccbb31ccbb13ccbb14ccbb15ccbb32cc

Stunning Views! I want to go back and camp this fall so I can get a sunrise and sunset.

Once you are up there you never see a sign pointing you to Snow Falls. We didn’t even try to find it since we had to get back before dark. All and all it was a beautiful hike. I just wish the trail had been marked better. Once you leave the turn off point where you can take the trail to Laurel or Snow there is nothing else telling you where you are in the process. No mile markers or anything but the occasional ‘main trail’ sign and an arrow here or there.

If you go just give yourself plenty of time (it will take longer than you think). Take plenty of water and snacks.

bb11cc

 

Happy Hiking!

Ice Hiking Greeter and Foster Falls

The crazy low temperatures we have had for the last several days have made for some spectacular Instagram posts for frozen waterfalls and icicles.  And, as I am prone to do, I waited until the very last day that low temperatures were forecasted to go out and find me some frozen water.

I gathered together my closest hiking buddies (for the record, I have the BEST group of gals to hike with) and the four of us headed off into the cold, dreary Saturday morning in search of beauty and fellowship. We found it.

I have to admit I was taken aback by the number of cars that were in Greeter Falls parking lot when we pulled in. I mean, who is crazy enough to get out early with degrees in the teens and go hiking? Oh, wait!!! Nevermind.  I had really hoped that the hoopla was done and that I was the last person to decide to venture out and do this. I was so very wrong.  It was packed.  Packed with lots of people with cameras and equipment far better than mine. I suffer from LE aka. lens envy. I look at everyone else and figure why should I bother.

But I still do…..

trail1cc

Not sure how I captured a pink sun flare. I did not add that in post.

trail2cc

We stopped at Upper Greeter Falls first and were blown away.

uppergreetercc

icicles1cc

After seeing this we couldn’t wait to get down to the lower falls. The spiral staircase was clear of almost all ice. There was a huge frozen ice mass right next to them.

icehikecc1

Down the spiral and then down the long staircase to the base. It was ALL clear.

stairswebgfweb

closeupcc

closeup2cc

treesccThere was even a husky running around. He was thrilled with the cold temperatures. His tag reads ‘Winter’. How cool is that?

dogcc

After Greeter we trekked on over to Foster Falls. I have to admit Foster is my favorite waterfall. However, my picutres did not do it justice. Unlike Greeter it was actually flowing quite well. I had accidentally left my neutral density filters at home ( I know, made me sick too). I was not able to catch the soft flowing water without them.

The hike down to Foster is very steep. It is not a long hike at all, just very, very steep. There is a little cave house right at the beginning of the descend and the ice was absolutely beautiful.

ffcc1

ffcc2

ffcc3

Foster was creating a bowl at the base where the water had frozen when it splashed up.

It really was something to see.

ffcc4

A little further up on the rock climbers trail there was a huge, frozen fall on the rock face. It was stunning.

ffcc5

And, just like that, it was time to head back up the hill.

ffcc6

Did I mention it was steep?

ffcc7

ffcc9

And now, for the important part. I want to give a shout out to this awesome restaurant.

The post-hike meal. I mean, that IS why we hike isn’t it?

Whenever, and I mean with.out.fail, I am in the Savage Gulf area we stop and eat at Jim Oliver’s Smokehouse. I would describe it as Cracker Barrel’s redneck cousin. Their food is the best. I always get the bbq. They have a buffet as well that usually sports a gigantic iron skillet with bread budding. They have bbq sauce called “Blazin’ Rectum” and also have coffee and peach flavored sauces. You HAVE to stop there.  insert blurry iphone pic.

bbq

 

That’s it!

Happy Hiking!